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D0CUHE1# BESUBE SP 124 831 AOTHOH TITLE i'nstitdt Ion Sf ONS AGEUCT i»OB DATE NOTE avail&BLE FEOH EDBS FBICE DESCEIPTOES CG 010 619 pes jar.lais^ Lionel; And Others ; Heeds ind qharacteristics of Students in the Intermediate lea C^^ iges 12-16, A Comprehensive Rejriew^^f th^ Lifcatuxe ia30-1W with r. wholesome acceptance of mature interdiependency as one realizes that others need him as he needs them. Recommendations .4§r Educational Practice.^- Ottawa Dniy, (Ontario) • Faculty of Education. (Josselyn, 1971), '^^^ One index of emotional maturity suggested-by Sweeney and Dickenson fl953) is the ability of an adolescent to realistically^ appraise people and objects. Ado- lescents: Reading in Behavior and Developmen t. Quantitative Aspects of Early Adolescent Cognitive/Functioning; Implications for Educational Practice 3. Formal Operational Thought During Early Adolescence ' iii. School Summary for Emotional and Sociail Development BIBLIOGRAPHY' 257 262 268 273 277 283 2r94 294, 294 318 333 340 ____ m «LISt OF FIGURHS Figure * - " . - Diagram of the Circulatory Pattern in the Postnatal Human. Rates of Intelle'ctual Growth During ■ : Adolescence \ ' * . liepr^senf ative Differences in\ Adolescent "intelligence ■ vii. Trowbridge, "Encouraging Creativity Through\ Inservice Teacher Education", in Journal of Research and Developm^ent in Education , 4, 87-94, 1971. B^, Dark Ghetto; Dilemmas of Social Power , New York, Harper anil Row, 19^5. 363 "BIBLIOGRAPHY " 349 Cole, Luella and Irma Nelson Hall, Psychology of Adolescence 7th ed.. 4.' Psychological Consequences of Biological Change^ ^ 17 - ^ . Jpach:«in its own w'ay has great potential for contributing positively to the adolescent's, understanding of the^ nature of biological change taking place within him at adolescence and to the ■' ■ - , ' • •■ ' • ■ ' . It is, how- ever, expected that curriculum planners and designers for the » age groups 12 to 16 interpret the research data of this report in terms of their, own schools and communities, that is, that they provide the "^curricula ,needed to mat'cji :the highly variable and changing characteristics of the \ emerging adolescents and to meet the arange of individual differences which makes -the intermediate ye^fs a unique segment o£ the educational ladder. I wish to express my most sincere gratitude to my colleagues who. Ausubel (J9543 declared it axiomatic that th Ci nature of adolescent development is conditioned by childhood experience. to cover those topics that could have the most relevance to the cognitive functioning of the^ early adolescent as it relat ; : Thirty-tour modal behaviours* are -delineated on the most numerou$ ^ - ...... ' t No¥th-/^erican middle class), vvith ^important variations for age, sex ? The empirical evidence cited tends to Gd Af Irm the concept ^Of developmental tasks as adjustive ditticuities ■J* P ' ^ * . 4;e^ ^ngining the ens • of adtust-iwe - d i f f-icu M ty an indi^ ■yidual will )^xperience. Within each chapter, and wherever .possible', the educational implicaticfns were brought out as forcefully as one could. It may differ in time, culture, and theo- t retical point of view, the word adolescence derives from the Larln y verb adolescere which means *'to grow up". _ ■ - • ^ sidered d period of transition we are cautioned by Hurlock (1973), Ausubel (1954), and Osterrieth C1969) that it i*§ not di$creet from - and unrelated to childhood. (Jntarid Dept, of i^idiication, Toi;.pnto, 75 ^ ^ ^08p. Inherent in his appraisals are his ovm personal interrelationships. ' University of Ottawa*^ Press ^ 65 Hastsy Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6H5 ^ IDENTIFIERS MF-

those most likely to experi- I ence heightened emotionality (Hurlock, 1973; Neiny, 1970; Jersild, 1963; Dunbar, 1958). For boys it can serve as an advantage in reducing the number of f Tustratio TTS^ iir expression of mas cu Unity (Wus^^eii - and Jone ^ , II^Tt Schonfeld, 1950; Jones, 1949). mi^ ^ri - ances were found in this search of .'the' literature^ for this modal behaviour. While the clique is relatively smaller and offers a more intimate setting, the crowd offers a larget social atmo- '^Sphere an^ is primarily responsible for the change from the unisex cliques* of early adolescence to -the hetero- sexual cliques of late adolescence (Conger, 1973; Hur- lock 1973J Dunphy, 1963). C., "The Day and Night Performance of Teleprinter Switchboard Operators", in Occupational Psychology , 23, 1-6,.

'Development of Thought and Language: Vygotsky's Theoretical, Perspective a. General Cdnclusions and Recommendations for Educational Practice ^ page 228 IV.- EMPIRIC/VL BASE FOR THE EM6t I0NAL ANb SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF NORMAL ADOLESCENTS • • • * '"^ * ' ' • 1, Getieral Introduction ' r 24S ^2, Emotional Development' 2S2 — 252- X ii iii iv V vi vii - Emol J ,13 4". - Aggressive States Inhibitoty States - Fears ' - Inhibitory States - Anxiety and Worry Joyous and Happiness States or" Affectivity Self-Concept Social Development ■ , i. - Histogram of Typical Sleep in Young Adults.....: 121 4. T,, "Sex Differences in the Growth ©f Stature and it^ Component Segments of Hong Kong Chinese Children", in Zietschrift^ fur\ Morphologic und Anthropolog ie, 63(3), 323-340, 1972. S., "Child Rearing and Family Relationship Patterns of th\ Very Poor", in Welfare in Review , 3(1), 9-19, 1965.

Qualitative Aspects of Cognitive Functioniijg During Early Adolescence i. Educational implications of Qualitative Changes in Adolescent Cognitive Functioning iv. Impact of Percepto-Cognitive Styles on , Adolescent Cognitive Functioning il Developmental Trends in Perception ii . Field Dependence-Field Independence As a Cognitive Style 138 138 144 144 147 " 149 153 156 159 162 164 165 168- 181 183 191 197 203 1 207 207 216 220 i t ERIC ' TABLR OF CONTENTS ^Chapter 5. page 1.- Physical Growth and Physiological Development in Adolescence. Arrow s/In die ate Direction of Blood Flow 105 ■* ' • " ( 3.

Ph^siiological 'Age, Chronologi|^al Age, and Sexual Maturation . The Relationship Between Sexual Maturation and Other Physiological Parameters 68 V. It is o Ur experience that unless teachers have a ' ^ .personal interest in physiology this section is generally passed over rather superficially.

Introduction 93 Digestion and Nutrition ^ 93 ERIC XV TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter iii. Chapter two deals with the physiological and biological factors of growth.

,83 Plus Postage V HC Not Available from fi DRS. As he matures the adolescent will exhibit certain characteristic ttfays of regarding himself and others.

those most likely to experi- I ence heightened emotionality (Hurlock, 1973; Neiny, 1970; Jersild, 1963; Dunbar, 1958). For boys it can serve as an advantage in reducing the number of f Tustratio TTS^ iir expression of mas cu Unity (Wus^^eii - and Jone ^ , II^Tt Schonfeld, 1950; Jones, 1949). mi^ ^ri - ances were found in this search of .'the' literature^ for this modal behaviour. While the clique is relatively smaller and offers a more intimate setting, the crowd offers a larget social atmo- '^Sphere an^ is primarily responsible for the change from the unisex cliques* of early adolescence to -the hetero- sexual cliques of late adolescence (Conger, 1973; Hur- lock 1973J Dunphy, 1963). C., "The Day and Night Performance of Teleprinter Switchboard Operators", in Occupational Psychology , 23, 1-6,.

'Development of Thought and Language: Vygotsky's Theoretical, Perspective a. General Cdnclusions and Recommendations for Educational Practice ^ page 228 IV.- EMPIRIC/VL BASE FOR THE EM6t I0NAL ANb SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF NORMAL ADOLESCENTS • • • * '"^ * ' ' • 1, Getieral Introduction ' r 24S ^2, Emotional Development' 2S2 — 252- X ii iii iv V vi vii - Emol J ,13 4". - Aggressive States Inhibitoty States - Fears ' - Inhibitory States - Anxiety and Worry Joyous and Happiness States or" Affectivity Self-Concept Social Development ■ , i. - Histogram of Typical Sleep in Young Adults.....: 121 4. T,, "Sex Differences in the Growth ©f Stature and it^ Component Segments of Hong Kong Chinese Children", in Zietschrift^ fur\ Morphologic und Anthropolog ie, 63(3), 323-340, 1972. S., "Child Rearing and Family Relationship Patterns of th\ Very Poor", in Welfare in Review , 3(1), 9-19, 1965.

Qualitative Aspects of Cognitive Functioniijg During Early Adolescence i. Educational implications of Qualitative Changes in Adolescent Cognitive Functioning iv. Impact of Percepto-Cognitive Styles on , Adolescent Cognitive Functioning il Developmental Trends in Perception ii . Field Dependence-Field Independence As a Cognitive Style 138 138 144 144 147 " 149 153 156 159 162 164 165 168- 181 183 191 197 203 1 207 207 216 220 i t ERIC ' TABLR OF CONTENTS ^Chapter 5. page 1.- Physical Growth and Physiological Development in Adolescence. Arrow s/In die ate Direction of Blood Flow 105 ■* ' • " ( 3.

Ph^siiological 'Age, Chronologi|^al Age, and Sexual Maturation . The Relationship Between Sexual Maturation and Other Physiological Parameters 68 V. It is o Ur experience that unless teachers have a ' ^ .personal interest in physiology this section is generally passed over rather superficially.

Introduction 93 Digestion and Nutrition ^ 93 ERIC XV TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter iii. Chapter two deals with the physiological and biological factors of growth.

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